What is true, and HOW DO YOU KNOW?

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The Scientific Method

(definitions and explanations)



postulate: suggest or assume the existence, fact, or truth of (something) as a basis for reasoning, discussion, or belief.

hypothesis: a possible explanation that may answer the question

a research method:


  • Experimentation
  • Evaluation
  • Repeated experimentation
  • Conclusion

 



Taken from Dictionary.com (free online dictionary),


http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/science


SCIENCE: 

1.  a branch of knowledge or study dealing with a body of facts or truths systematically arranged and showing the operation of general laws: the mathematical sciences.


2.  knowledge, as of facts or principles; knowledge gained by systematic study.

 


Questions, and the search for their answers, form the basis of all sciences, and science is limited to questions that can be tested. Explanations are sought using a process known as Scientific Method. This approach requires evidence to answer questions.

 

Note: The scientific method is not a rigid set of rules that must all be done; but it makes up the 'common threads' of most successful experiments. The Scientific Method is based on a number of set skills collectively known as Science Process Skills.



How is Biology studied?


Biology is an ongoing record of discoveries that arise from people asking questions about the natural world. Is is based on the idea that natural phenomena have natural causes that can be discovered by testing.

Questions, and the search for their answers, form the basis of all sciences, and science is limited to questions that can be tested.

Explanations are sought using a process known as Scientific Method. This approach requires evidence to answer questions. Note: The scientific method is not a rigid set of rules that must all be done; but makes up the 'common threads' of most successful experiments. The Scientific Method is based on a number of sets of skills collectively known as Science Process Skills:

1. Observing: Observe some aspect of nature.
2.
Questioning: "Why do...?" "What happens if I...?" "How does...?"

3. Inferring: Develop a hypothesis (a possible explanation that may answer the question)

4. Prediction: Make a prediction of what the outcome would be if the hypothesis were true
This is called deductive, or "if-then", reasoning

5. Measuring: Test the prediction by experiments, observations, or models.

Usually, a literature search is done before doing the test to avoid "reinventing the wheel".
If the tests
do not confirm the prediction, determine whether the hypothesis may need to be modified.


If the tests
do confirm the prediction, repeat the tests for consistency.

5. Communicating: Explain the results and Report the conclusions via papers in scientific journals (peer-reviewed.


Key Info (SEE > Steps of the Scientific Method)


The scientific method is a way to ask and answer scientific questions by making observations and doing experiments.

The steps of the scientific method are to:

Ask a Question

Do Background Research

Construct a Hypothesis

Test Your Hypothesis by Doing an Experiment

Analyze Your Data and Draw a Conclusion

Communicate Your Results

 

 

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We are vigilant in our efforts to provide a maximum user friendly interaction and learning experience. But you may fine some area that is not finished or where some features may not work as they should; so please bear with us. Much like a fetus in the womb: our campus and studies are formed and developed according to the tabernacle-pattern which serves as a universal principle. Because the pattern, as a principle, is a threefold structure; therefore the development of our university and learning programs are also arranged in three parts.  Once our programs are completed the student or learner should be greatly benefited from this structured and systematic way of learning.  The Book of Exodus is the source for our direction in this task (see Exodus 25:8-9, 40; Hebrews 8:3-5).